Games Console for people with disabilities

Project  / Project number: 126/19  /  Status:

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The challenge

Carers for people with dementia find it very difficult to occupy and keep interested people with dementia and to assess any deterioration

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The solution

A games console was developed and made using 16 arcade led buttons, arranged in a 4×4 matrix, controlled using an arduino processor.¬† 4 games of varying complexity were processed, looking at response, recognition and reaction timing.¬† Each game has 10 “goes” and the total time is displayed at the end for 5 seconds together with a tune. The player can select which game they wish to play by pressing the button at the top of the respective column, column 1 starts game 1, column 2 starts game 2, column 3 starts game 3, and column 4 starts game 4. Game 1 requires the player to press a button that illuminates at random, game 2 is the most simple and shows a coloured¬† rectangle on the display and the player needs to press any button of that colour to move to the next step, game 3 is the most complex and requires the player to press the button that corresponds to its position shown on the display, game 4 requires the fastest reaction, it is as game 1 but if the illuminated button is not depressed quickly, that button will go out and another button illuminates at random, the time interval can be altered from 1 to 2.5 seconds in 4 steps.

5 of these consoles have been made, one has been funded by a care home in Rayleigh Essex, one has been given to Remap head office for display stands, one is on loan to a care organisation that enables and cares for disabled adults and provides respite for carers, one is used by Essex Central for display stands, and one, still in construction will be offered to other care activities.

We have also been approached by the Deaf & Blind Association to develip a game console for blind and partially sighted people.

The benefit

People of all abilities and disabilities can enjoy and stimulate themselves using the game console, also carers can use it as a competitive device to stimulate interaction within groups.

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