Anywhere

 

Homecraft Pick-Up Reacher Modification

This is a modification to the Homecraft Rolyan Pick-Up Reacher.

The problem with the standard grabber is that it only pinches the sides of an object if you pick it up from lying down. The modification with wider jaws and a design that curves round means that it can get underneath the object to ‘scoop’ it… making it easier to pick up (and also maintain hold with a weaker grip).

Accessibility Handle for BT 4600 DECT Phone

This is a handle which is designed to clip onto a BT 4600 DECT Phone to aid grip. It is for those with weaker hands and/or limited mobility, and means that if grip is lost, the phone remains in the hand rather than dropping.

Mobility chair desk top

Add multi-purpose ‘desk top’ to child’s mobility chair so she could start school with her own table top.

Coat donning aid

The client needed someone to help him put his jacket as he had difficulty putting his arms into the sleeves.

Table-top frame for visual stimuli

The client has very limited movement and enjoys looking at different visual stimuli. A light weight frame was made which clamps to his over-wheelchair table, from which visual stimuli can be suspended. A battery-powered fan provides movement.

Wheelchair cup holder

Tracy needs a cupholder that clips onto the front of her wheelchair armrest, not on the side where it gets broken. A simple bracket was made that slips into the front of the armrest using the same fixing as her table.

Safety bottle top opener

The safety screw tops found on many bottles that require the top to be squeezed before being turned, can be difficult to master by those with reduced dexterity. This solution requires a simple modification to standard slip-jaw pliers

Noise box trainer

A teacher needed a device to help blind and partially sighted children to practice their ability to locate and identify sounds.

Wheelchair foot plates

The limited adjustment of the client’s wheelchair footsupports meant that his feet were not supported comfortably. Longer cushions were added to the footplates to provide the required support.

HandShake – using hand motion to control switchable software

Some people with e.g. cerebral palsy are unable to use physical controllers such as buttons and joysticks but are still able to make intentional hand movements. HandShake uses a pair of BBC Micro:bits to enable triggers to be sent to switchable communication software to enable speech to be composed. A trigger is sent to the communications device when the participant moves a hand above an adjustable threshold of acceleration.